Author Archives: iain_emsley

I am a developer in the Janet web team as well as occasionally working on some Open Source projects. The views expressed on this blog are mine alone and are not to be taken as a position or comment by Janet.

The Unheard City

Some time ago, I mentioned a project that was starting called the Unheard City to explore sonification of Internet of Things devices and the phone. Well, it is alive, or coming to be. The Unheard City website is coming into being with the sounds here and is the subject of a talk this Sunday at […]

OpenAI codex

I was sent the link to the OpenAI Codex coding demo on YouTube, which was a lot of fun and interesting. It makes me think of the no code movement. At one level, I really enjoyed it and I like the fluency of the API that is being used. What worries me slightly is that […]

Safari and web-based digital methods

Tim Perry writes a persuasive blog post on Safari and the state of browsers, Safari isn’t protecting the web. It covers a lot of ground but I get the larger picture now, having struggled with getting relatively simple web APIs working in Safari but without issue in Firefox and Chrome. In this regard, I do […]

An introduction to Sounding out the System

In this blog post, I present a paper for the Research Infrastructures for Web Science (RI4WebSci) workshop with Alan Chamberlain. I will also add in some extra data that is not in the paper. The paper discusses the use of an experimental Humanities (Chamberlain et al., 2017; Emsley et al. 2019) approach to a short […]

A new project – Unheard City

A short post really but I am in the process of starting a new small project called the Unheard City. It is a side project, so I expect the pace to be slow, but it explores ideas that I have had in my head for a short while. What does the city sound like when […]

Installing and Using ProvConvert on OSX

I have just gone back to earlier work where I am using ProvConvert to visualise a PROV graph. I have had issues with installing and using it before so have been really wary of it. Until I came across Soiland Reye’s excellent blog post on the subject. As I am using openJDK through Homebrew on […]

Refreshing the blog

This is slightly more as an aide memoire than a post but Mark Carrigan has written a useful post on about academic blogging on the Post-Pandemic University blog, Academic blogging – both/and rather than either/or. The note towards discussing research that is already written or planned is the part that resonates. I suspect that, like […]

An Experimental Philosophy of Technology

Philosophy and Technology has an interesting article on the idea of Experimental Philosophy of Technology or Techxphi, by Steven R. Kraaijeveld. The argument seems to focus mainly on developing the ethical side. It seems like a way of testing various intuitions and assumptions and might be an area to keep an eye on to see […]

AudioVisual edition of Digital Humanities Quarterly

The preview version of the latest Digital Humanities Quarterly is out and is an AudioVisual Data in DH special edition.

Towards a playful approach

It has been a while since I posted and one hopes to get back to it in due course. I was leafing through some unread emails and came across the link to this reflection by Geoffrey Rockwell on Stéfan Sinclair, Celebrating Stéfan Sinclair: A Dialogue from 2007. The thing that really struck me was the […]